Real-Time MRI Music Video (實時MRI音樂MV)

31 01 2013

Art + Music + Medicine + Technology  = one stunning music video!

Sivu, a UK based musician, laid in an MRI scanner while repeatedly singing his song “Better Man Than He” for 2-3 hours. The real-time MRI footage shows the sagittal section of Sivu’s head as his mouth and tongue move to each word. The video also shows the coronal passage and 3D volume rendering of his head.

Real-time MRI, a relatively new technique, allows the live capture of images of objects in motion and is being employed to study organs such as the heart, joint kinetics and complicated coordinated movements employed during speaking, swallowing and singing as seen here.

Sivu – Better Man Than He. from Adam Powell on Vimeo.

The music video was created by director Adam Powell with the help of doctors Marc E. Miquel and Andrew David Scott at Barts Hospital London.

[via Medgadget + Street Anatomy]

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Resident Evil 6 Human Butcher Shop (惡靈古堡6人肉專賣店)

6 10 2012

To promote the release of Resident Evil 6, Capcom sponsored Wesker & Son Resident Evil Human Butchery in East London.

Once at the butchery, members of the public will be invited to sample and purchase a dizzying array of edible human limbs including hands, feet and a human head, which will be available to buy directly from the shop.  As well as these specially created products, gamers will be able to buy ‘Peppered Human & Lemon Sausages’ and ‘J’avo Caught Human Thigh Steaks’ along with some specially made pots of Red Herb and Green Herb.  All proceeds from the sale of the meat will be donated to the Limbless Association, which provides information and support to the limb-loss community.

In addition to the pop-up human butchery and morgue, Resident Evil fans will be invited to attend two days of lectures at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital Pathology Museum, which have been designed to explore some of the themes in the game and their links to real life.

[via Neatorama + Street Anatomy]





3D Printed Prosthetic Beak (3D印刷假鳥嘴)

16 08 2012

A bald eagle, named Beauty, was found with the top half of her beak shot off. Rescued by Jane Fink Cantwell of Birds of Prey Northwest, Beauty is unable to feed or clean herself due to the loss of anatomy. While visiting the rescue center with his daughters, Nate Calvin of the Kinetic Engineering Group offered to help create a prosthetic beak. Calvin made a mold of the disfigured upper beak, laser-scanned it, modeled a prosthetic beak to fit the existing beak in a 3D modeling program, and 3D printed the prosthesis with a nylon-based polymer.

With the assistance of a dentist, the prosthetic beak was successfully implanted into Beauty’s existing beak. Beauty is now able to preen, drink and feed on her own once again.

[via Make]





3D Printed Fetus (3D印刷胎兒)

31 07 2012

Recognizing the desire of expecting parents to commemorate the visualization of their newborn, Fasotec, a Japanese medical 3-D printing firm, partnered up with Parkside Hiroo Ladies Clinic in Tokyo to provide “Shape of an Angel,” a miniature 3D model of the fetus as it lays in the womb.

The process entails a MRI scan of the fetus. The MRI scan is then processed using special 3D software. A 3D printer by Object is then used to fabricate the 3D model, using clear resin for the mother’s body and white resin for the fetus as it appears in the womb.

A “Shape of an Angel” costs 100,000 yen (US $1,230) for a 90x60x40mm model, which comes in a lovely white jewelry box.

[via RocketNews24]





Jordan Eagles’ Works of Blood

8 04 2012

New York City artist, Jordan Eagles, sometimes referred to as the “blood artist” has been using blood procured from a slaughterhouse as his primary medium for over a decade. Eagles manipulates the blood through layering, heating, burning, aging, and sometimes mixing with copper to spark the flow of energy once present. Preserved and encased in plexiglass and UV resin, the “works becomes relics of that which was once living, embodying transformation, regeneration and an allegory of death to life.” When illuminated, the works of blood project a glow from within exploring the themes of corporeality, mortality, spirituality and science.

See more of Jordan Eagles’ work at jordaneagles.com.

[via Street Anatomy]





Embodiment: A Luminous Glass Skeleton by Eric Franklin

8 04 2012

Portland-based sculptor, Eric Franklin constructs an anatomical study of the human body considering the mind and body as one entity out of flame-worked borosilicate glass filled with ionized krypton, causing it to glow like a neon light. Embodiment, handcrafted out of 10 separate glass units, took Franklin over 1,000 hours to produce in a two-year span. Franklin’s description of the painstaking process:

Every glass seal has to be perfect, and this piece contains hundreds. Everywhere one tube joins another, or a tube terminates, glass tubes were sealed together. They have to be perfect in order to preserve the luminosity of the krypton. If one rogue molecule gets inside the void of the glass tubing it can eventually contaminate the gas and it will no longer glow. There are times when the holes in the seals are so small that you cannot actually see them with your eyes without the help of a leak detector. Once the glass pieces are ready to get filled with gas, I pull a high vacuum while the glass is hot in order to evacuate any dust or water vapor from the interior surface until there are literally no molecules inside the void of the glass. Then the krypton can be introduced and the glass sealed off. It’s an extremely tedious process, one I have somewhat of a love/hate relationship with.

Photos by Brad Carlile.

See more of Eric Franklin’s work on his website.

[via  COLOSSAL]





Rapid Prototyped Auricular Mold (快速原型模型)

8 12 2011

Heavily inspired by the iRSM Digital Design in Facial Prosthetics workshop in Edmonton, Canada this summer, my classmate Lindsay and I conducted a study on rapid prototyping a digitally designed 3-piece auricular prosthesis mold. We utilized an iCAT to obtain DICOM files of our ear casts and patient treatment site.

The DICOM files were then imported into Materialise Mimics to mirror the existing ear to adapt to the treatment surface. It was then booleoned from a larger cylinder and digitally designed into a 3-piece auricular mold with keyways to ensure proper fitting. A workflow was then created for the digital fabrication of the mold utilizing Mimics.

The STL of the completed mold was sent to a ZPrinter 310 Plus to be rapid prototyped with a high composite powder and binder.

After printing, the mold was retrieved for postproduction work of drying, infiltrating with cyanoacrylate, and sanding for a final finish.

The prostheses fabricated from the rapid prototyped molds will be used to assess anatomical accuracies to the original ear casts and compared to the traditionally fabricated prostheses through wax sculpting. Another assessment will be made on time and cost effectiveness to determine its feasibility for clinical application.