Embodiment: A Luminous Glass Skeleton by Eric Franklin

8 04 2012

Portland-based sculptor, Eric Franklin constructs an anatomical study of the human body considering the mind and body as one entity out of flame-worked borosilicate glass filled with ionized krypton, causing it to glow like a neon light. Embodiment, handcrafted out of 10 separate glass units, took Franklin over 1,000 hours to produce in a two-year span. Franklin’s description of the painstaking process:

Every glass seal has to be perfect, and this piece contains hundreds. Everywhere one tube joins another, or a tube terminates, glass tubes were sealed together. They have to be perfect in order to preserve the luminosity of the krypton. If one rogue molecule gets inside the void of the glass tubing it can eventually contaminate the gas and it will no longer glow. There are times when the holes in the seals are so small that you cannot actually see them with your eyes without the help of a leak detector. Once the glass pieces are ready to get filled with gas, I pull a high vacuum while the glass is hot in order to evacuate any dust or water vapor from the interior surface until there are literally no molecules inside the void of the glass. Then the krypton can be introduced and the glass sealed off. It’s an extremely tedious process, one I have somewhat of a love/hate relationship with.

Photos by Brad Carlile.

See more of Eric Franklin’s work on his website.

[via  COLOSSAL]





Ascending Colon (升結腸)

8 02 2011

Illustration Techniques Assignment 1

Objective: Produce a fully rendered, highly detailed anatomical line illustration done in Corel Painter 11 for publication in college textbook.





Cockroach (蟑螂)

12 01 2011

After my first teaching experience as a Biology TA and playing with the Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches in lab, I feel re-inspired by them especially after reading this:

“In September 2006, amusement park Six Flags Great America announced it would be granting unlimited line-jumping privileges for all rides to anyone who could eat a live Madagascar hissing cockroach as part of a Halloween-themed FrightFest. Furthermore, if a contestant managed to beat the previous world record (eating 36 cockroaches in 1 minute), he would receive season passes for four people during the 2007 season. This is a difficult record to break because raw cockroaches contain a mild neurotoxin that numbs the mouth and makes it difficult to swallow. The promotion ended on October 29, 2006.”

[via Wikipedia]

Image courtesy stock.xpert