Jordan Eagles’ Works of Blood

8 04 2012

New York City artist, Jordan Eagles, sometimes referred to as the “blood artist” has been using blood procured from a slaughterhouse as his primary medium for over a decade. Eagles manipulates the blood through layering, heating, burning, aging, and sometimes mixing with copper to spark the flow of energy once present. Preserved and encased in plexiglass and UV resin, the “works becomes relics of that which was once living, embodying transformation, regeneration and an allegory of death to life.” When illuminated, the works of blood project a glow from within exploring the themes of corporeality, mortality, spirituality and science.

See more of Jordan Eagles’ work at jordaneagles.com.

[via Street Anatomy]





Embodiment: A Luminous Glass Skeleton by Eric Franklin

8 04 2012

Portland-based sculptor, Eric Franklin constructs an anatomical study of the human body considering the mind and body as one entity out of flame-worked borosilicate glass filled with ionized krypton, causing it to glow like a neon light. Embodiment, handcrafted out of 10 separate glass units, took Franklin over 1,000 hours to produce in a two-year span. Franklin’s description of the painstaking process:

Every glass seal has to be perfect, and this piece contains hundreds. Everywhere one tube joins another, or a tube terminates, glass tubes were sealed together. They have to be perfect in order to preserve the luminosity of the krypton. If one rogue molecule gets inside the void of the glass tubing it can eventually contaminate the gas and it will no longer glow. There are times when the holes in the seals are so small that you cannot actually see them with your eyes without the help of a leak detector. Once the glass pieces are ready to get filled with gas, I pull a high vacuum while the glass is hot in order to evacuate any dust or water vapor from the interior surface until there are literally no molecules inside the void of the glass. Then the krypton can be introduced and the glass sealed off. It’s an extremely tedious process, one I have somewhat of a love/hate relationship with.

Photos by Brad Carlile.

See more of Eric Franklin’s work on his website.

[via  COLOSSAL]





Brainstorm (集思廣益)

22 01 2011

The exhibition Brainstorm: investigating the brain through art & science at GV Art in London has been called by a politician as “degrading”, “disrespectful” and “unacceptable.”

This work titled Headache by Helen Pynor is one of many that showcase brains in different ways, from films of neurological examinations to actual human brain tissues. GV Art in London is one of the few places licensed to display human tissue in Britain.

To the politician’s concerns, Dr. Dexter, scientific director of the Joint Multiple Sclerosis Society and Parkinson’s UK Tissue Bank responded in an editorial in the Guardian:

Would we have had such a reactionary response to an art exhibition about the kidney and kidney disease? What is it about the brain that generates such an exaggerated reaction? Is it because the brain is the organ we use to think?…

Brain slices from previous neuropathological examinations are used in the human section of the display at GV Art. They are there not only to educate the public about what a brain looks like and how it can be affected by disease, but also to contextualise where some of the art work originated. Art has a significant role to play in science as a tool for communicating to the public what the scientist sees in the laboratory, in a form that can be understood by everyone…

You don’t go about demystifying the brain by locking it away in a laboratory, but by appropriately involving it in widely accessible media like art. This exhibition is a bold step in the right direction.

[via Guardian via Mr. Ross]