3D Printed Prosthetic Beak (3D印刷假鳥嘴)

16 08 2012

A bald eagle, named Beauty, was found with the top half of her beak shot off. Rescued by Jane Fink Cantwell of Birds of Prey Northwest, Beauty is unable to feed or clean herself due to the loss of anatomy. While visiting the rescue center with his daughters, Nate Calvin of the Kinetic Engineering Group offered to help create a prosthetic beak. Calvin made a mold of the disfigured upper beak, laser-scanned it, modeled a prosthetic beak to fit the existing beak in a 3D modeling program, and 3D printed the prosthesis with a nylon-based polymer.

With the assistance of a dentist, the prosthetic beak was successfully implanted into Beauty’s existing beak. Beauty is now able to preen, drink and feed on her own once again.

[via Make]

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Rapid Prototyped Auricular Mold (快速原型模型)

8 12 2011

Heavily inspired by the iRSM Digital Design in Facial Prosthetics workshop in Edmonton, Canada this summer, my classmate Lindsay and I conducted a study on rapid prototyping a digitally designed 3-piece auricular prosthesis mold. We utilized an iCAT to obtain DICOM files of our ear casts and patient treatment site.

The DICOM files were then imported into Materialise Mimics to mirror the existing ear to adapt to the treatment surface. It was then booleoned from a larger cylinder and digitally designed into a 3-piece auricular mold with keyways to ensure proper fitting. A workflow was then created for the digital fabrication of the mold utilizing Mimics.

The STL of the completed mold was sent to a ZPrinter 310 Plus to be rapid prototyped with a high composite powder and binder.

After printing, the mold was retrieved for postproduction work of drying, infiltrating with cyanoacrylate, and sanding for a final finish.

The prostheses fabricated from the rapid prototyped molds will be used to assess anatomical accuracies to the original ear casts and compared to the traditionally fabricated prostheses through wax sculpting. Another assessment will be made on time and cost effectiveness to determine its feasibility for clinical application.





Auricular Prosthesis (假耳)

7 05 2011

Special Topics in Anaplastology: Fabrication of an Auricular Prosthesis

Impression Making

Marking Frankfort horizontal for orientation of prosthesis on defect cast.

Impression Casting

Wax Sculpting

Mold Making

3 part mold with a wedge piece to prevent undercut behind helix.

Intrinsic Coloration & Mold Packing

Flocking – short colored fibers were added for a subtle color change and to mimic vasculature.

Base color – semi-opaque underlying skin tone; commonly identified from underside of the forearm, along the hairline, anterior to the tragus, and at the base of the helix.

Laminar glazes: pink blush, freckling, tan, highlight (cartilage), and shadow.

Trimming & Extrinsic Coloration

Trimming excess flash with scissors and smoothing helical seam with silicone bur.

Color matching for extrinsic coloration.

Extrinsic pigments added to medical adhesive moisture-cure silicone.

Deshine with confectioner sugar to alter the surface geometry of the silicone.

Once cured, rinse the sugar off with water.

Fabrication complete with piercing.





First Nose (鼻子)

27 09 2010

My classmate Lindsay and I made our first nose in the Maxillofacial Prosthetics Clinic to test the integrity of a chipped mold.

Process:

The surface of the plaster mold was painted with two coats of separating agent with a paintbrush. A fast-set silicone was weighed and placed on a piece of glass for intrinsic coloring, where the color agents are mixed into the material itself. Primary colors were added until the color resembled a skin tone. Flocking, short colored fibers were added for a subtle color change and to mimic vasculature. The silicone was collected back into a small container and a catalyst, 10% of silicone’s weight, was added and mixed well. The catalyzed mixture was then placed back on the piece of glass and spread thinly for air removal with a spatula. Afterwards, the mold was filled the mixture and pressed tightly. It was cured in an oven and was magically retrieved when we returned a week later.