Jordan Eagles’ Works of Blood

8 04 2012

New York City artist, Jordan Eagles, sometimes referred to as the “blood artist” has been using blood procured from a slaughterhouse as his primary medium for over a decade. Eagles manipulates the blood through layering, heating, burning, aging, and sometimes mixing with copper to spark the flow of energy once present. Preserved and encased in plexiglass and UV resin, the “works becomes relics of that which was once living, embodying transformation, regeneration and an allegory of death to life.” When illuminated, the works of blood project a glow from within exploring the themes of corporeality, mortality, spirituality and science.

See more of Jordan Eagles’ work at jordaneagles.com.

[via Street Anatomy]





Rapid Prototyped Auricular Mold (快速原型模型)

8 12 2011

Heavily inspired by the iRSM Digital Design in Facial Prosthetics workshop in Edmonton, Canada this summer, my classmate Lindsay and I conducted a study on rapid prototyping a digitally designed 3-piece auricular prosthesis mold. We utilized an iCAT to obtain DICOM files of our ear casts and patient treatment site.

The DICOM files were then imported into Materialise Mimics to mirror the existing ear to adapt to the treatment surface. It was then booleoned from a larger cylinder and digitally designed into a 3-piece auricular mold with keyways to ensure proper fitting. A workflow was then created for the digital fabrication of the mold utilizing Mimics.

The STL of the completed mold was sent to a ZPrinter 310 Plus to be rapid prototyped with a high composite powder and binder.

After printing, the mold was retrieved for postproduction work of drying, infiltrating with cyanoacrylate, and sanding for a final finish.

The prostheses fabricated from the rapid prototyped molds will be used to assess anatomical accuracies to the original ear casts and compared to the traditionally fabricated prostheses through wax sculpting. Another assessment will be made on time and cost effectiveness to determine its feasibility for clinical application.





新世界『透明標本』Iori Tomita’s New World Transparent Specimens

20 09 2011

新世界「透明標本」 – New World Transparent Specimens is an exhibition composed of specimens created using a preservation and dyeing technique typically used for scientific purposes to examine the skeletal system.

Tomita uses an enzyme to dissolve the natural proteins in the soft tissue. He then injects magenta dyes into the bones and blue dyes into the cartilages, highlighting the usually unseen internal structures. The creature is then preserved in a jar of glycerin.

Some of Tomita’s smaller specimens (fish, shrimp and squid) can actually be purchased in a few stores in Japan, but the larger specimens (lizards, birds and turtles) are only available in his exhibitions.

He has also published two books:  [新世界]透明標本“New World Transparent Specimens” with descriptions of over 50 species and 透明な沈黙 “Toumei na Chimmoku” with more stunning photographs woven together with the words of philosopher Wittgenstein.

Read and see more stunning creations on Tomita’s website!

[via gakuranman]

These transparent specimens reminded me of David’s fetal monkey!





Visual Word Form Area (視覺詞形區)

6 03 2011

Graphic Design Assignment 5: Concept Communication Piece

Purpose: Express the following through type, image, graphic elements, and/or CMYK color.

The part of the brain thought to be responsible for processing visual text may not require vision at all, researchers report in the journal Current Biology.

This region, known as the visual word form area, processes words when people with normal vision read, but researchers found that it is also activated when the blind read using Braille.

Full article [via The New York Times]





Brainstorm (集思廣益)

22 01 2011

The exhibition Brainstorm: investigating the brain through art & science at GV Art in London has been called by a politician as “degrading”, “disrespectful” and “unacceptable.”

This work titled Headache by Helen Pynor is one of many that showcase brains in different ways, from films of neurological examinations to actual human brain tissues. GV Art in London is one of the few places licensed to display human tissue in Britain.

To the politician’s concerns, Dr. Dexter, scientific director of the Joint Multiple Sclerosis Society and Parkinson’s UK Tissue Bank responded in an editorial in the Guardian:

Would we have had such a reactionary response to an art exhibition about the kidney and kidney disease? What is it about the brain that generates such an exaggerated reaction? Is it because the brain is the organ we use to think?…

Brain slices from previous neuropathological examinations are used in the human section of the display at GV Art. They are there not only to educate the public about what a brain looks like and how it can be affected by disease, but also to contextualise where some of the art work originated. Art has a significant role to play in science as a tool for communicating to the public what the scientist sees in the laboratory, in a form that can be understood by everyone…

You don’t go about demystifying the brain by locking it away in a laboratory, but by appropriately involving it in widely accessible media like art. This exhibition is a bold step in the right direction.

[via Guardian via Mr. Ross]





Cockroach (蟑螂)

12 01 2011

After my first teaching experience as a Biology TA and playing with the Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches in lab, I feel re-inspired by them especially after reading this:

“In September 2006, amusement park Six Flags Great America announced it would be granting unlimited line-jumping privileges for all rides to anyone who could eat a live Madagascar hissing cockroach as part of a Halloween-themed FrightFest. Furthermore, if a contestant managed to beat the previous world record (eating 36 cockroaches in 1 minute), he would receive season passes for four people during the 2007 season. This is a difficult record to break because raw cockroaches contain a mild neurotoxin that numbs the mouth and makes it difficult to swallow. The promotion ended on October 29, 2006.”

[via Wikipedia]

Image courtesy stock.xpert





Indirect Plant Defense (間接植物防禦)

8 12 2010

Subject: Indirect Plant Defense

When a corn plant is munched by a caterpillar, the physical damage and certain chemicals in the caterpillar’s saliva combine to elicit release of volatile compounds from the corn leaf. This attracts parasitoid wasps that lay their eggs in the hapless caterpillars’ bodies.

Audience: Children in basic science courses of grade school

Media: Animated GIF

GIF animation is an excellent way of illustrating a simple concept while adding a real sense of motion to capture the short attention span of the students. Since animated GIF is automatically recognizable to most Web browsers, schools will only need internet connection for viewing.